Immortals

“It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the dullest most uninteresting person you can talk to may one day be a creature which,if you saw it now, you would be strongly tempted to worship, or else a horror and a corruption such as you now meet, if at all, only in a nightmare. All day long we are, in some degree helping each other to one or the other of these destinations. It is in the light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe and the circumspection proper to them, that we should conduct all of our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all play, all politics. There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations – these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub, and exploit – immortal horrors or everlasting splendors.”

-C.S. Lewis The Weight of Glory

The Word Brings Forth Life

My first in depth encounter with this set of verses came when I was memorizing the Navigators TMS (Topical Memory System) and learning how to grow through mediation on the Bible. I recall being a bit confused as to how I could trust the message of these verses. It was Scripture that promoted the argument that the Scriptures came from God. Almost like an American who asserts that America has replaced Israel as God’s chosen nation, the claim seemed a bit self-serving. This was my attitude towards this passage until I realized that Paul (the human author of this text) was not writing this down with the understanding that he was penning what would one day be referred to as Scripture itself. This fact seemed to actually help me in my full acceptance of the passage’s legitimacy.